Salesforce

How to get Fiscal Year NPSP Rollups with Custom Fiscal Year Enabled by Michelle Regal

Inheriting a Salesforce org from another administrator can be both freeing and frustrating. One major source of frustration we’ve seen recently? New admins logging into their new-to-them orgs, only to find that the previous admin enabled Custom Fiscal Years.

*cue melancholy music*

This is horrifying for a couple of reasons, mainly

1. Your organization does not have custom fiscal years. Say it with me: “My organization does not have custom fiscal years.” That’s right, if your organization’s fiscal year is a standard 365 days (no matter when it starts), then you do not need Custom Fiscal Year enabled.
2. Once you turn on Custom Fiscal Year, you can’t turn it off. Ever. Even Salesforce Support can’t turn it off for you. You’ll need to start a whole new instance of Salesforce.
3. All of your NPSP rollup fields that calculate donations based on Fiscal Year are invalid because they aren’t compatible with the Custom Fiscal Year setting.

So what’s an admin to do?

After shaking your fists at the sky and crying out in frustration, head over to the AppExchange and install Declarative Lookup Rollup Summaries (DLRS)* in your Salesforce instance, because we’re going to solve your donation rollup problem!

Once you have DLRS installed in your org, you’ll need to create a few fields on the Opportunity and Contact objects to help with the rollup calculations.

First, create a number formula field to calculate the Fiscal Year on the Opportunity (Donation). The formula should look something like this:

CASE(
  MONTH( CloseDate ),
  1, (Year( CloseDate )),
  2, (Year( CloseDate )),
  3, (Year( CloseDate )),
  4, (Year( CloseDate )),
  5, (Year( CloseDate )),
  6, (Year( CloseDate )),
  (Year( CloseDate))+1)

In this example, a donation made on 2/1/2016 (February 1st, 2016)  would be assigned as Fiscal Year 2016, while a donation made on 7/1/2016 (July 1st, 2016) would be assigned as Fiscal Year 2017. 

Update the formula so the CASE function includes a line for every month in the calendar year before your fiscal year start. For example, this organization’s fiscal year starts on July 1 (7/1), so I included a CASE condition for months 1-6.

Create a currency field on the Contact to hold the sum of donations for a particular fiscal year (i.e. Sum of Donations FY2017). This is where the result of your DLRS rollup summary will go. 

Next, create the Lookup Rollup Summary to sum the amount of all related Opportunities (Donations) that are Closed Won and fall in that fiscal year. The key is setting the Criteria: StageName = 'Closed Won' AND Fiscal_Year__c = 2017. 

Fiscal Year NPSP Rollups

Similarly, if you want to count the number of donations in a particular fiscal year, you just need to create a number field on the Contact object to hold the amount and create a Lookup Rollup Summary where the Aggregate Operation is Count.

But what if I just want a field that calculates for THIS fiscal year?

The only way to automate that is with custom Apex code. However, you can “hack” a solution with DLRS by just updating the year specified in the Relationship Criteria to the current fiscal year. (You’ll just need to remember to update it each time a new FY rolls around.) Just remember to click Save and then Calculate when you update the year so all your Contact records get updated.

* Make sure to read through the DLRS documentation to learn about how the rollup summaries work, latest release features, and any limitations.
 

Your Salesforce Needs Some Design Love (Part Three) by Reilly Ellis

Usability Testing (You are not your users)

The most important thing to remember about design is that you are not your users. The design principles that I previously covered will help you set the groundwork for a usable system, but the best way to see if your system is usable is to test your users using it.

Remember the law of familiarity. Admins are in Salesforce all the time. What makes sense to you may because of your history with the platform may not make sense to someone who is just in Salesforce to enter program data.

The is doubly true when you’re doing a redesign or introducing a new feature. You’ve developed familiarity with your design through the time that you spent creating it. It can be hard for you to tell if something makes sense because of its design or because you’ve developed a learned association.

Usability Testing vs. User Acceptance Testing

You’ve probably does user tests in your system before, but it’s likely those were user acceptance tests. User acceptance testing checks to see if your systems working correctly, for instance, does the “Total Payments” rollup accurately calculate all the payments?

Usability testing checks if your users are using your system correctly. For instance, do they know what the “Total Payments” field is? Do they use it like you want them to use it?
 

Usability Testing in Six Steps

1. Identify users

Survey a range of users - new users, super users, and users who still struggle.

2. Introduce a scenario or task

This is what you’ll be testing! Something like, “create a new contact” or “find the date of someone’s last donation.”

3. Ask the user to narrate their thoughts while they complete the task

Their narration will give you insight into your design. What parts do they understand? What parts are they missing?

4. Observe the user complete the task (silently!)

This may be the hardest part of user testing - but it’s important for you to stay silent. You won’t always be there to guide them when they’re using Salesforce.

5. Ask follow-up questions after the task

This is your chance to dig in to the actions you observed and get more feedback on the design.

6. Iterate & repeat!

Make the necessary changes, find more users, and repeat!

…….

Usability Testing Quick Tips

Not everything is perfectly intuitive the first time around. You can test “learnability” by asking the same user to complete the same task multiple times. If they get it after a couple tries, great! If they still need help weeks later, you should reassess your design.

If you or your users don’t have time for dedicated usability testing - wrap it in with training. When your users ask you how to complete as task, have them show you how they do it first before you show them. This will give you some quick insight to the usability of your design.

Salesforce Spring '17 Release Overview

The Spring '17 Release empowers everyone to be their best with amazing new innovation for Einstein and Lightning built right into the Customer Success Platform. We want to make sure you're prepared to take full advantage of all the new features. Join our AMER Success Team for release highlights, use cases and best practices that will help you drive business value for your end users.

Reflections from Tahoe Dreamin’

Reflections from Tahoe Dreamin’

 

There is something special about community-run regional Salesforce events like Tahoe Dreamin’. They’re more intimate events that allow for more meaningful conversations. And there’s something special about a conference run entirely by Salesforce users who want to dedicate their time to learning more about Salesforce

Last week, 200 Salesforce users gathered in South Lake Tahoe to network, learn, and get inspired.

Sarah Joyce Franklin, SVP of Developer Relations and GM or Trailhead at Salesforce, gave a keynote speech that set the tone for the conference. In it, she made three key points that provided a new perspective on how you work with your Salesforce instance:

1. Change the story from “Can I change the world?” to “Will I change the world?”.

At Now IT Matters, our clients are in the business of changing the world, and that can be a daunting task. From connecting with constituents to monitoring program outcomes, leveraging Salesforce to fit your organization’s needs can be equally intimidating. But instead of asking yourself if you can do it, as yourself how you will do it. Just changing the story puts you on a path and is the first step in planning your success.

2. Do not be ruled by fear.

As I attended the sessions at Tahoe Dreamin’, I amended this to “Do not be afraid of Lightning.” Many nonprofits have been reluctant to switch over to the new platform because it’s different, it’s unknown. And if we’re being honest, that’s a little scary.

But Lightning isn’t something to be intimidated or worried about, it’s something to explore and be excited about! Turn it on in one of your sandboxes and play around. Collect use cases from your Salesforce users and see how you can solve them in Lightning. If you fail, it’s just a sandbox. And if you succeed, your users will thank you.

3. Be the change.

This comes from the famous Gandhi quote, “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” And it holds true when managing a Salesforce instance. Be an example to your users. Inspire them to learn Salesforce by earning some Trailhead badges, or get a certification. Want them to get excited about the platform? Get excited about the new features coming out in the Spring ‘17 release and share them with your users.

Whether skiing down a snowy mountain or taking the leap to convert your org to Lightning, the point is to take the chance. Could you end up with a failed project (or a face full of snow)? Absolutely. But try anyway.

What is My Domain and why will Salesforce require it?

What is My Domain and why will Salesforce require it?

Starting with the Spring ‘17 release, Salesforce is going to require that all current and new Salesforce orgs have My Domain enabled.

This new requirement will help avoid any surprises when Salesforce performs routine maintenance on its servers. My Domain is also required to create a branded login or use Single Sign-On with Salesforce and to use Lightning Components.

How do I know if I have My Domain enabled?

The easiest way to see if you have My Domain enabled is to log into your Salesforce org and look at the URL.

If it looks like this:

mydomainurl1-2

with something like your company’s name followed by “.my.salesforce.com”, then congratulations! You’ve already enabled My Domain in your org. Way to be ahead of the game!

If it looks like this:

nomydomainurl

with a letter/number combination like na29 preceeding “.salesforce.com”, then you do not have My Domain enabled for your org and should enable it before the Spring ‘17 release.

How do I enable My Domain?

Surprise! There’s a Trailhead trail for that. The trail takes about an hour, and will walk through all the steps and considerations for creating a subdomain in Salesforce.

Here are a few things to keep in mind while turning on My Domain:

  • The subdomain cannot be changed once created, so choose wisely!
  • Any hard-coded references to URLs in your Visualforce pages, Email templates, etc. will need to be updated with your new orl URL. We recommend having an advanced Administrator or Developer make these updates. This article provides information on how to find and update hard-coded references in Salesforce.
  • Once My Domain is enabled, users will be able to log in to your Salesforce org by going to http://[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"][subdomain].my.salesforce.com instead of to the Salesforce login website.

My Domain creates a more branded experience for your users and will ensure fewer headaches in the future as Salesforce continues to update and maintain its systems.[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

NPSP: So Much Change, So Little Time

So Much Change, So Little TimeHousehold Naming & Primary Contacts

There have been many big changes lately to the Nonprofit Success Pack that a few new features may have been missed.

For example, you can now adjust the universal Household Name settings so that only the Primary Contact of a Household is included within a Household Name and within associated Formal and Informal Greetings for all Households in your Salesforce org.

Let’s say there are two members of a Household: Fred and Wilma Flinstone and that Wilma is set as the Primary Contact. Now you can adjust the Household Naming settings so that only Wilma’s name is used for purposes of naming.

In the example above the result of these changes would be:

Household Name = Wilma Flintstone Household

Formal Greeting = Mrs. Wilma Flintstone

Informal Greeting = Wilma

To make the adjustment go into Household Name Settings within the NPSP Settings utility.  Now update the following values within Household Name Settings:

  • Name Connector = (leave empty)
  • Name Overrun = (leave empty)
  • Contact Overrun Count = 1

screenhunter_2846-nov-04

 

After making this adjustment you’ll need to use the Refresh Household Names batch feature to force an update of Household Naming throughout your records.

A word of caution: these changes will apply to all Households in Salesforce.

An Alternative: Case-by-Case Changes

If you only want to limit the Household Name to the Primary Contact on a case-by-case basis, then utilize the Manage Household button on individual Household records.

The Managed Household feature will provide more granular control by allowing a user to exclude specific contacts from Household Naming fields. In the example below, the child within a household is excluded.

screenhunter_2848-nov-04

To learn more about Household Naming check out this article from the Power of Us Hub: https://powerofus.force.com/kA080000000CsCJ?srPos=0&srKp=ka0&lang=en_US

 

Cloud TnT: That Much Better for Someone Else: Nick Lindberg

cover170x170

A PODCAST FOR NONPROFITS USING SALESFORCE. With Tim Lockie, Tracy Kronzak, and Joni Martin.

A more humorous review of Dreamforce 16 recorded BEFORE Dreamforce – yeah, we’re that good. And we also talk to MVP Nick Lindberg about service, friendship, and the Good Old Days of Salesforcelandia. A heartwarming story of family and community ensues. 

dreamforce

That Much Better for Someone Else: Nick Lindberg

 

 

#LevelUp with the Salesforce Community

How One DevAdmin #LeveledUp at Dreamforce

dreamforce

More than one person has described Dreamforce to me as going to Summer camp, where you get to reunite with all the friends you haven’t seen for the past year. While this might not be the best way to convince your boss to let you attend this conference-to-end-all-conferences, it does highlight one of the most valuable products Salesforce has to offer: the community.

Yes, the hands-on-training sessions are great learning tools, and the keynotes are always an exciting look at what’s coming up in future product releases. But when you’re back at your office, sitting in front of your computer, baffled by the Process Builder that keeps inexplicably failing, who’s going to help you?

Answer: all those friends you see every year at Dreamforce.

Whether you post your question in the Success Community, Developer Forum, Power of US Hub, or call in to one of the dozens of office hours hosted by Salesforce users like you, you have a wealth of access to people who’ve stared at that same Process Builder and want to help you be successful.

So go ahead, give us your toughest questions, your seemingly insurmountable Salesforce challenges. We’ve got a community of thousands that wants to help you #LevelUp.

How NiM #LeveledUp at Dreamforce

What we have Learned and how NiM #LeveledUp at Dreamforce '16

dreamforce

Dreamforce '12 was my first Dreamforce. My focus that week was on spending time with the NiM team, individual empowerment, and skills acquisition. In addition to meetings with my team, I had a long list of sessions to attend and I scurried all over campus to be sure I was at the "must do" events. By the third day, I had learned a ton, but I was WORN OUT! I had also missed a key opportunity to build community.

While Salesforce.org offers ways to build community online through the Power of Us Hub and the Success Community, Dreamforce just can't be beat for connecting in person. The connections I made at Dreamforce '15 provided a source of inspiration and encouragement that lasted the whole year!

For Dreamforce '16, my goal was simple: have five meaningful conversations.

Some of these conversations were with old friends, some with folks I knew from the Power of Us Hub but had never met in person, some with strangers. I find myself thinking daily about these conversations and how I can allow those conversations to take root and shape NiM -- and me -- this coming year.