Salesforce Admin

A Single Merge to Rule Them All

A Single Merge to Rule Them All

It’s often a thankless task, but sending out Thank You letters is an important part of the development process. These letters give nonprofits yet another way to engage supporters so it’s important to personalize their message whenever practical.

Enter Apsona and Apsona Document and Email Merge. Nonprofits can leverage these powerful, but inexpensive utilities to produce custom acknowledgment letters for print or email and do so with only single generation of merged letters.

Let’s use a real-life example to demonstrate what we mean.

Let’s say a nonprofit receives 200 donations one week and they break down as such:

  • 100 received with no indication of what campaign generated the donation
  • 50 received at a dinner gala to support a specific program
  • 25 received because of an end of year campaign
  • 25 received in advance of a summer fun run

In the above situation a nonprofit has a couple options:

  1. Send 200 acknowledgments with a generic thank you and no mention of what prompted the gift
  2. Send custom acknowledgments with a message specific to the encounter that generated the donation.

The first option above is typically the fastest, but also the least satisfying.  The second option is best, but often requires generating multiple document merges, one for each campaign, and that can become time-consuming for staff. Utilizing a little trick we developed, a nonprofit can get the best of both options: efficiency and greater customization.

An Overview of the Solution

The solution relies upon each active Campaign having an Acknowledgement Letter field containing the main body of an acknowledgment letter. In addition, each Donation record should identify the relevant Campaign above via the Primary Campaign Source field.  If the relevant Campaign isn’t known then utilize a default or placeholder Campaign.

Utilizing an Apsona report and merge action, these fields link each Donation to the appropriate acknowledgment Campaign for purposes of merging the relevant text into an Acknowledgement letter.

Configuring the Acknowledgement Solution

The configuration isn’t horribly difficult; however, it requires a familiarity with creating and editing Salesforce fields, updating page layouts, creating Apsona reports and merge actions, and creating a MS Word document with appropriate merge fields.  Below is a high-level overview of the configuration.

Step 1 - Fields

There are four Salesforce fields required:

  • Acknowledgment Letter - Create a long text field on the Campaign object and set the number of lines to at least 20. The field should be added to all relevant Campaign page layouts.

For each active Campaign that may generate donations, be sure to populate this field with the body of a corresponding Acknowledgement letter. The body should consist of all text beginning after “Dear …” and should include a sign-off such as “Sincerely, Executive Director.”

  • Primary Campaign Source - This is a standard Salesforce Donation field that already exists although it should be made required to ensure all future donations have a Campaign value.  This field will identify what Campaign for the proper acknowledgment letter. Alternatively, if there is concern about using this standard field, then consider a custom Donation field that looks up to a Campaign record.
  • Acknowledgment Status - The Nonprofit Success Pack (NPSP) includes this field. Creating the following picklist values if they do not already exists and ensure the field has been added to all relevant Donation page layouts:
    • To Be Acknowledged (set this as the default value for the picklist)
    • Do Not Acknowledge
    • Acknowledged
  • Acknowledgment Date - The NPSP also includes this field so ensure it is visible on all relevant Donation page layouts.

Step 2 - Merge File

There are two key elements to remember.

First, you’ll need to create an Apsona-friendly MS Word template. For more about how to create a merge template.

Second, you’ll need to upload the template to Salesforce Documents so that it is available to Apsona. This document should include a merge field that will be a placeholder for the Acknowledgement Letter text. To see a simplified merge document.

Step 3 - Apsona Single-Step Report

Create an Apsona Donation report. This report should include any relevant Donation, Account, and Contact fields, as well as the fields indicated above. This ensures the text of the Acknowledgement letter is available for merging and for updating of the Acknowledgement Status and Date fields. For more about creating Apsona reports.

Step 4 - Apsona Merge Action

Finally, you’ll want to create an Apsona Merge Action to complement the report above. For more about creating Apsona Merge Actions. This action should do each of the following:

  • Identify the Salesforce Document above for merging
  • Map the merge fields, including the Acknowledgement Letter field
  • Set the Acknowledgement Status to Acknowledged
  • Set the Acknowledgement Date
  • Generate a single MS Word document for printing
  • If desired, create an Activity entry for each Donation acknowledged

Solution Variations

The approach outlined above is simply one approach. There are a number of ways it can be adjusted to meet your nonprofit's needs. For example, some nonprofits will prefer to email these acknowledgments while others might prefer a different set of actions upon creation of a merge document.

We Can Help

Of course, every Salesforce instance and every nonprofit’s needs will vary and that’s why Now IT Matter’s is here to help. In addition to configuring solutions such as this, we also help clients think about how to streamline and enhance current processes so they aren’t stuck with a one-size-fits-all solution. If you think this solution might be for you then give us a call so we can talk more about your nonprofit’s needs.

A Little Hope Goes A Long Way

A Little Hope Goes A Long Way

 

Chronic depression has been a shadow of mine since high school, and while I’ve learned to live and deal with it, life events sometimes darken the world for me; so to say that 2016 wasn’t great for me is an understatement. From a bitter election to my dad’s cancer diagnosis, it felt like the year ground humanity down; Carrie Fisher was the last straw. I was reminded last week that hope is the best defense against despair. When it comes to hope a little can go a long way. So I want to start 2017 with a few Bozeman nonprofit organizations and Salesforce heroes that gave me hope in a hard year.

 

gbgv

First up is Bridget Wilkinson from Bozeman Area Community Foundation on the day that the online giving platform, Kimbia, went down for the local Give Big day that she spent a year organizing. Over 130 local nonprofits had spent months working on social media, local businesses had volunteered their locations as donor lounges; thousands of hours went into preparing for a day of giving only to have the online platform stall out at 9:30 in the morning. I had talked Bridget into letting me play tech support for the day, and by 10 am the writing was on the wall, Kimbia wasn’t functional. At 10:30 four of us put our heads together and came up with a plan. Katie worked media communication with Bridget, a board member set up a phone bank with a local business ( Foundant), and I set up a google spreadsheet to hand enter donations. Yes, a google spreadsheet. Our goal for the day was $300,000 in donations. When the dust settled (two weeks later) we had raised over $430,000. 19 volunteers hand entered over 2,000 donations recorded on printouts of the google sheet. Bridget has entered legendary status (which she deserves) among Montana nonprofits (I heard at a conference that Bridget had another backup plan in case the first backup plan failed). It reminded me that technology, while important, is never a replacement for relationships; people give to people.

familypromiselogoLate in 2015 I met Christine Armstrong the Volunteer & Outreach Manager at Family Promise of Gallatin Valley at her office after hearing that she needed some help with Salesforce. The vision of Family Promise is near to my heart, and I wanted to help. Her salesforce instance was overwhelming her and an hour with me didn’t do much to help. In fact, I left feeling that I had made things worse and that she was going to avoid the system and just work in excel as much as possible. I could not have been more mistaken. She was at the first User Group meeting and started using two hours a week to focus on learning Salesforce. She presented on custom fields at a future user group meeting and by mid-summer, she was working with a Salesforce tech from the National office of Family Promise to get her instance upgraded. She came to nearly every Summer School user group session where she used what she had learned to help other users with their Salesforce issues. Her grit and perseverance inspired and helped me to believe in the resilience of awesome admins.

mccWendy Wigert, Director of Operations with Montana Conservation Corps (MCC) is a force to be reckoned with. She is friendly and personable, but when it comes to Salesforce and data she is also on the ball, in control, and comes to a discussion with strong opinions and unapologetic (and reasonable) expectations. It doesn’t work for every personality, but Wendy pulls it off with style and as a result, MCC continues to grow as it provides Montana with valuable services and develops the leaders of tomorrow. It seems like every third person I meet in Montana has served with MCC. NiM migrated two Access databases for MCC last year and provided initial training for their staff. Wendy had her team in Trailhead getting badges and learning Salesforce before the first Access database was even exported. She doesn’t just talk about Salesforce with her staff, she learns it and creates the space for her staff to learn it as well. And while that might be rare, it’s best practice and what we hope for; it meets our expectations for a good admin and project champion. However, she was a first on two things in consulting. First, she created the time and space for her staff to correct all data errors that they could find; by hand one record at a time; this included several thousand duplicate records. When I told her about a dedupe tool she pointed out that she and her staff would know the data much better by looking at each record and that at the end of it would be sure that the data was pristine. I had my doubts that the work would get done, but she hired a temp, created time for her staff, and they had it knocked out within a few weeks. She also instituted a bi-weekly learning meeting (called Brain Trust) where her staff show up and answer questions and solve issues together. There is a strong economic argument that the best expense an organization can make is increasing knowledge of internal processes, and MC is proving this to be true. Wendy has transformed their data footprint with a smile on her face; encouraging words to her staff to level up with Salesforce, and personally demonstrates to me what can be done with focus and commitment.

thrive-logoThen there’s Thrive. They have been making families stronger and supporting kids for over 30 years. When my son was struggling with reading we met with teachers and guess who showed up… yep, someone from Thrive. When my daughter started having lunch with a college-aged mentor once a week guess who set it up; also, Thrive. The best teacher I have ever experienced, quit construction in his 40’s and got a teaching degree because of his volunteer work with Thrive. Vanessa Skelton helped implement Salesforce a few years ago and now co-leads the Bozeman Salesforce User Group with me. Last year I had the privilege to share office space at Thrive. I witnessed first hand the passion their staff holds for the children they serve when one staff member was brought to tears when she received bad news about a mentee. I’m not totally comfortable with the fact that her sobs brought me hope, but as someone who uses cynicism as a shield, the raw grief and vulnerability of that moment motivated me to embrace the sad instead of pretending it away.

rogue-oneI saw Rogue One the day that Carrie Fisher (Princess Leia) passed away. Maybe I was more reflective than I should have been, however, the movie left me pondering the relationship between Hope and Sacrifice; that rebellions and nonprofits are built on them. Thank you to all of you who stand for a better world against all odds and give of yourself personally each day to our community; you are being watched and you are making a difference! I would love to hear where you found hope in 2016 and your aspirations for 2017.

What is My Domain and why will Salesforce require it?

What is My Domain and why will Salesforce require it?

Starting with the Spring ‘17 release, Salesforce is going to require that all current and new Salesforce orgs have My Domain enabled.

This new requirement will help avoid any surprises when Salesforce performs routine maintenance on its servers. My Domain is also required to create a branded login or use Single Sign-On with Salesforce and to use Lightning Components.

How do I know if I have My Domain enabled?

The easiest way to see if you have My Domain enabled is to log into your Salesforce org and look at the URL.

If it looks like this:

mydomainurl1-2

with something like your company’s name followed by “.my.salesforce.com”, then congratulations! You’ve already enabled My Domain in your org. Way to be ahead of the game!

If it looks like this:

nomydomainurl

with a letter/number combination like na29 preceeding “.salesforce.com”, then you do not have My Domain enabled for your org and should enable it before the Spring ‘17 release.

How do I enable My Domain?

Surprise! There’s a Trailhead trail for that. The trail takes about an hour, and will walk through all the steps and considerations for creating a subdomain in Salesforce.

Here are a few things to keep in mind while turning on My Domain:

  • The subdomain cannot be changed once created, so choose wisely!
  • Any hard-coded references to URLs in your Visualforce pages, Email templates, etc. will need to be updated with your new orl URL. We recommend having an advanced Administrator or Developer make these updates. This article provides information on how to find and update hard-coded references in Salesforce.
  • Once My Domain is enabled, users will be able to log in to your Salesforce org by going to http://[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"][subdomain].my.salesforce.com instead of to the Salesforce login website.

My Domain creates a more branded experience for your users and will ensure fewer headaches in the future as Salesforce continues to update and maintain its systems.[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

NPSP: So Much Change, So Little Time

So Much Change, So Little TimeHousehold Naming & Primary Contacts

There have been many big changes lately to the Nonprofit Success Pack that a few new features may have been missed.

For example, you can now adjust the universal Household Name settings so that only the Primary Contact of a Household is included within a Household Name and within associated Formal and Informal Greetings for all Households in your Salesforce org.

Let’s say there are two members of a Household: Fred and Wilma Flinstone and that Wilma is set as the Primary Contact. Now you can adjust the Household Naming settings so that only Wilma’s name is used for purposes of naming.

In the example above the result of these changes would be:

Household Name = Wilma Flintstone Household

Formal Greeting = Mrs. Wilma Flintstone

Informal Greeting = Wilma

To make the adjustment go into Household Name Settings within the NPSP Settings utility.  Now update the following values within Household Name Settings:

  • Name Connector = (leave empty)
  • Name Overrun = (leave empty)
  • Contact Overrun Count = 1

screenhunter_2846-nov-04

 

After making this adjustment you’ll need to use the Refresh Household Names batch feature to force an update of Household Naming throughout your records.

A word of caution: these changes will apply to all Households in Salesforce.

An Alternative: Case-by-Case Changes

If you only want to limit the Household Name to the Primary Contact on a case-by-case basis, then utilize the Manage Household button on individual Household records.

The Managed Household feature will provide more granular control by allowing a user to exclude specific contacts from Household Naming fields. In the example below, the child within a household is excluded.

screenhunter_2848-nov-04

To learn more about Household Naming check out this article from the Power of Us Hub: https://powerofus.force.com/kA080000000CsCJ?srPos=0&srKp=ka0&lang=en_US

 

Cloud TnT: Staff Favorite Episodes

cover170x170CLOUD TnT: A PODCAST FOR NONPROFITS USING SALESFORCE.With Tim Lockie, Tracy Kronzak, and Joni Martin.

Want more Cloud TnT?!? Catch up with some staff favorites from this year:

 

 

stevemolis

A Screwdriver and Lightning Boat: Steve Molis

A Very Special Cloud TnT with Salesforce superstar Steve Molis. Cloud TnT covers all kinds of ground, from answering questions and being of genuine service, to equality for all. Tracy fangirls out, and then cries (again). SteveMo chokes up. This is a golden recording, and there are no words for how much fun we had, just listen…

 

  adamkramer

The Next Level: Adam Kramer

While Tim’s away, Cloud TnT is helmed by Joni and Tracy with a fantastic interview with #AwesomeAdmin and consultant extraordinaire, Don Draper. We mean, Adam Kramer. Topics include NPSP evangelism, the NPSP Advisory Board, and building on the NPSP as a technical and community tool, and taking it all to the next level. Does the NPSP have a new mascot? It just might…

 

 

maddYou Really Have to Solve the Problem: Chris Robinson

 

While Tracy is away, Joni and Tim continue Cloud TnT’s #AwesomeAdmin series. Mothers Against Drunk Driving uses Salesforce to help deliver its nationwide services, and Chris talks about his journey implementing, his organization’s work, creating buy-in, and how being a Salesforce administrator fits in to all of it.

 

bonnyhinners

Bringing Us Together: Bonny Hinners

A lively discussion with #AwesomeAdmin, User Group leader, and MVP Bonny Hinners all about how important the customer is to Salesforce, and the changing role of the Salesforce community. A great segue to Dreamforce and the newly-announced Nonprofit Success Pack, covering the Dreamforce keynote previews and the Boston NPSP Sprint. We’re super excited to be heading to Dreamforce this year!

Learn Salesforce to #LevelUp your Career

Are you ready to #LevelUp your Career?

career Three years ago, my family and I made the decision to relocate from Houston, Texas to northern New Hampshire for my husband’s job. For those of you who have never been to New Hampshire, let’s just say there aren’t a ton of job opportunities available; especially when you live in the middle of the mountains and the cell service isn’t so great!

As luck would have it, a friend of mine mentioned her “Salesforce consulting firm” (Now It Matters) was looking for a part-time team member who could assist with training and development initiatives.

After applying and going through a short interview process, Now It Matters offered to facilitate my education of Salesforce, and extended a virtual job offer to me. The best part was I could do all of this from my home office!

Now, it’s two years later. I’ve survived a fierce winter (if you are contemplating two weeks in negative 30 degree weather, let’s just say “I don’t recommend it!”) and receiving my Salesforce Administrator certification (on my second attempt, but don’t tell anyone), my family and I moved back to Austin, TX. There, we decided it was time for me to return to work full time.

Little did I know that doors of opportunity would open up for me as a newly certified Salesforce Administrator! As I searched for a full time training and development position I realized the interview requests I received weren’t only a result of my 10+ years of work experience, but could also be attributed to Salesforce experience. With only two years of Salesforce experience under my belt I was a hot commodity!

As you may know, Salesforce is far-reaching and applicable for any industry. Plus, its support tools (Power of Us Hub, Success Community, Trailhead) are outstanding. The moral of my story is: If you have the opportunity to learn Salesforce, then take it! Who knows?! You may love Salesforce so much that you find yourself going down a completely different career path than intended. At the very least, Salesforce will help you #LevelUp and gain a competitive edge along your existing career path.

Nonprofit Geek Mecca 2014: Dreamforce

dreamforce2014-logoIn October, roughly 140,000 people will make the pilgrimage to San Francisco for Dreamforce where they will learn new ways to do more good (better) with technology! For one week every year, San Francisco is transformed into the Mecca of Geekery, and, although the majority of attendees fall more in the “geek” category than the “nonprofit” category, Social Good and Changing the World are common themes in all areas of Dreamforce. Last year, 20,000+ of the attendees were nonprofits and with ample opportunities to learn, grow and connect, it makes sense for nonprofits to attend. As a nonprofit, the Dreamforce experience will help you discover new tools and brush up on time-tested strategies with dynamic programming, case studies and leadership insights to keep you and your organization on point. You will have the opportunity to engage with a diverse group of your peers from nonprofits of all types and sizes, including foundations, charities, education, museums, associations and more! With dozens of classes and sessions aimed at nonprofits (and entire floor dedicated to all things nonprofit in the Foundation Zone) Dreamforce will inspire you, give you new ways of looking at challenges, educate you, and will connect you to thousands of other nonprofit geeks who share your passion for world change. Bonus: the Salesforce Foundation also offers a $799 discount for all nonprofits attending! …And just in case you’re still not convinced, here are my top three reasons to attend Dreamforce:

  • Networking. Where else can you go where you can sit down to have lunch with the Grameen Foundation and the Global Fund to discuss best fundraising strategies for the 21st century? Dreamforce gives you the unique opportunity to talk to other nonprofits looking for the best ways to use Salesforce for their organization, and access to worldwide nonprofit and NGO practitioners (like American Red Cross, Polaris Project, and IAVA!). Not only will you have the opportunity to find out how trendsetting orgs are using technology to do more good better, but you’ll have the chance to speak with these guys personally about how they are addressing the world’s issues beyond the data level!
  • Education. Hands on trainings, breakouts, sessions, spontaneous demonstrations – education is flying around you everywhere you go at Dreamforce. You can take back loads of information and resources to help your organization rise to new levels… and getting some solutions immediately? Priceless.
  • Vision. One of the best things about Dreamforce is understanding where your CRM is going and how the evolution affects your organizational impact. New solution sets and ever-increasing integrations and customizations mean your org has more reach than ever before. Going to Dreamforce gives you the vision for what your organization can do to leverage your resources to maximize impact.

We hope to see you there this year! If you’re planning on attending, please make sure to email us so we can set up a time to connect while we’re there! Register for Dreamforce 2014 here: http://www.salesforcefoundation.org/events/dreamforce/

Data in a Jiffy

[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"] So, you're in a jam. You need your data quickly, and your Exec needs it in Excel to do some pivot tables. You're not the best at Salesforce yet, but you know enough to get around. Enter Dataloader.io! During my first few months with Salesforce, this was one of the best ways for me to quickly get data in and out of Salesforce and do it simply. It also helped me learn about the relationships between the different tables in Salesforce while doing so.

For those of you who like data (like spreadsheets) and geek out a bit here and there (but don't have a SF specific background): Dataloader.io is just what it says, data in, data out. It also features the ability to match on text fields if needed. No need to look up Record ID's if you know the name of the Record! For the newbies out there, this is a great way to just experiment with exporting data from Salesforce in a different way from the usual running reports format. This isn't the only tool to be sure, but for a simple interface and a web based dialog - it does the trick!

Pro's:

  • Simple interface and three options (Import/export/delete). Case in point - just tried to find Quick Text to load records in another data loading custom tool and I couldn't find it - swing over to dataloader.io and its there.
  • Helps to have a backup Data Loader choice in case your main one runs into a snafu.

Con's:

  • Have to use a login to get in (oh well).
  • Will teach you how the tables are organized in Salesforce-whether you like it or not.
  • Access to all objects from a non-Salesforce standard interface.

For further information about data management tools, check out these resources:

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4 Best Practices for Nonprofits Using Salesforce

[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"] Often nonprofits become frustrated and overwhelmed when using a CRM system as sophisticated and complex as Salesforce. How do I get help? Where do I find resources to train our staff? Where are the answers to my questions?

Here are some best practices for nonprofits using Salesforce. Help is just a click away!

1. Become involved in a Salesforce Community online or in person. There are a number of communities online that offer free help and support for nonprofits utilizing Salesforce. Some of my most utilized are:

Salesforce Success Community (https://success.salesforce.com)

The Success Community has several components, among the most helpful:

  • Answers: This tab has answers to commonly asked questions around Salesforce functionality and how to do various things.  Hint: If you google a Salesforce question, you almost without fail return an answer that is helpful. Those results are generally in the Salesforce Success Community Answers.
  • Help and Training: This is where you can contact support, find out about new releases, and take online training videos (many free!) surrounding Salesforce functions and best uses!
  • Ideas: If Salesforce doesn’t do it yet, you can bet there’s an idea submitted about that function! If you find your suggestion for improvement in the Ideas section, make sure to vote it up so Salesforce makes the change!
  • User Groups (under “More”):  User Groups are a great resource for getting your questions answered and finding solutions to your problems. I highly recommend that everyone become part of the User Group in your area. They have nonprofit user groups as well as developer UGs and Admin UGs

Power of Us Hub (powerofus.salesforcefoundation.org/publogin)

Using your regular Salesforce login, you can get into the Power of US Hub. This community is much like the Salesforce Success Community, except that it is specific to nonprofit Salesforce users. It has questions and groups like the other community, as well as helpful resources specific to NPOs.

2. Train your staff to use the things they need. If your staff member is running reports, they should watch a report building training video, or join one of the many free Salesforce webinars covering common uses of Salesforce produced for the community. If they are needing to primarily use Campaigns, check out a video or read best practices white papers in the Success Community about campaign usage. If the information is being kept in Salesforce, staff should not be permitted to keep it elsewhere – ie, keeping their contacts separately on an excel spreadsheet.

3. Map your processes and come up with standardized practices surrounding the entry of information. Where is information being duplicated? How many people are touching the same data and putting it into different places? How does a member’s life cycle at your organization look on paper? Reduce the number of touches each person’s data has – i.e., Contact information should be entered directly on the Contact record, rather than in Outlook address books and/or excel and/or paper and/or Access. If the constituent NEEDS to live in 2 places, (ie – accounting for payroll information AND Salesforce for membership information) that can be acceptable, but it’s in your best interest to reduce the number of places to as few as possible.

4. Address User Adoption. Why aren’t people using Salesforce? There are a number of ways to get people logged into Salesforce and using the system. One good way is through the use of Chatter, a collaborative tool that will allow you to communicate electronically with all of the staff in your organization, and have organic conversations around donors, members, constituents, opportunities, or any other items you’re tracking in Salesforce. There are user adoption dashboards available for download in the AppExchange as well. Once people are working in the system, it comes alive. People begin to trust the data, and people begin to find that they have built a 360 degree view of your constituents by collaboration and smart processes.

 

Dive in Deeper:

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