Less is More: 3 Simple Ways to Clean-up your Salesforce Instance

Less is More: 3 Simple Ways to Clean-up Salesforce

less-is-more-trick-blog

Everyone (well most everyone) appreciates a nice, neat workspace. It helps one focus on what’s most important and promotes calm in a sea of endless distractions.

It’s no different for Salesforce. Eliminating system bloat can go a long way toward improving the user experience.

Here are three relatively simple ways to begin cleaning up your Salesforce instance.

Fields

The granddaddy of bloat is too many fields. It’s starts innocently enough with a single user request, but over time those user requests for fields begin to take a toll on end-users and administrators

The problem with too many fields

  • Increases data entry time as users search through increasingly long page layouts
  • The most important fields get lost among trivial fields

Do you really need a field?

  • Is the field required to capture information for key reports such as those for reporting on a grant?
  • Are staff even bothering to complete a given field?

Cleaning Up the Bloat A great first step is installing the FREE application Field Trip. This utility scans your Salesforce data so it can report on how frequently a field is being used. If no one is bothering to complete a given field, then it probably isn’t important enough to keep around. To make a case for eliminating extraneous fields run a few Feld Trip reports, summarize your findings, and discuss with your power users and management team.

Get Field Trip - https://appexchange.salesforce.com/listingDetail?listingId=a0N30000003HSXEEA4

List Views

list-bloat-blogList Views can get out of hand FAST, especially if all users have access to create new List Views!

The great thing about List Views is that you can quickly get to key records without running a report; however, if everyone is making their own List Vies and sharing them with everyone else then it all blurs together.

Questions to Ask?

  • Is a List View being used regularly? – Maybe it was created for a special purpose 5 years ago and has since been forgotten.  If so, delete it.
  • Does everyone need access to see a particular List View? – Maybe some List Views are only needed by development staff while others support programming staff, if so restrict visibility as needed.

Does everyone need access to create new List Views? – Get ahead of the problem by limiting who can create new List Views.

Chatter Groups

chatter-archive-blogCleaning up Chatter groups is as easy as 1-2-3

First, review all active Chatter groups and Archive those that are not actively used. You can do this by opening up a group’s settings and clicking the Archive button.

Second, updated the settings for each group so that they automatically archive after 90 days of inactivity.

About Archiving

  • Archiving does not delete a group and its content
  • An archived group can be reactivated

What is My Domain and why will Salesforce require it?

What is My Domain and why will Salesforce require it?

Starting with the Spring ‘17 release, Salesforce is going to require that all current and new Salesforce orgs have My Domain enabled.

This new requirement will help avoid any surprises when Salesforce performs routine maintenance on its servers. My Domain is also required to create a branded login or use Single Sign-On with Salesforce and to use Lightning Components.

How do I know if I have My Domain enabled?

The easiest way to see if you have My Domain enabled is to log into your Salesforce org and look at the URL.

If it looks like this:

mydomainurl1-2

with something like your company’s name followed by “.my.salesforce.com”, then congratulations! You’ve already enabled My Domain in your org. Way to be ahead of the game!

If it looks like this:

nomydomainurl

with a letter/number combination like na29 preceeding “.salesforce.com”, then you do not have My Domain enabled for your org and should enable it before the Spring ‘17 release.

How do I enable My Domain?

Surprise! There’s a Trailhead trail for that. The trail takes about an hour, and will walk through all the steps and considerations for creating a subdomain in Salesforce.

Here are a few things to keep in mind while turning on My Domain:

  • The subdomain cannot be changed once created, so choose wisely!
  • Any hard-coded references to URLs in your Visualforce pages, Email templates, etc. will need to be updated with your new orl URL. We recommend having an advanced Administrator or Developer make these updates. This article provides information on how to find and update hard-coded references in Salesforce.
  • Once My Domain is enabled, users will be able to log in to your Salesforce org by going to http://[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"][subdomain].my.salesforce.com instead of to the Salesforce login website.

My Domain creates a more branded experience for your users and will ensure fewer headaches in the future as Salesforce continues to update and maintain its systems.[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

NPSP: So Much Change, So Little Time

So Much Change, So Little TimeHousehold Naming & Primary Contacts

There have been many big changes lately to the Nonprofit Success Pack that a few new features may have been missed.

For example, you can now adjust the universal Household Name settings so that only the Primary Contact of a Household is included within a Household Name and within associated Formal and Informal Greetings for all Households in your Salesforce org.

Let’s say there are two members of a Household: Fred and Wilma Flinstone and that Wilma is set as the Primary Contact. Now you can adjust the Household Naming settings so that only Wilma’s name is used for purposes of naming.

In the example above the result of these changes would be:

Household Name = Wilma Flintstone Household

Formal Greeting = Mrs. Wilma Flintstone

Informal Greeting = Wilma

To make the adjustment go into Household Name Settings within the NPSP Settings utility.  Now update the following values within Household Name Settings:

  • Name Connector = (leave empty)
  • Name Overrun = (leave empty)
  • Contact Overrun Count = 1

screenhunter_2846-nov-04

 

After making this adjustment you’ll need to use the Refresh Household Names batch feature to force an update of Household Naming throughout your records.

A word of caution: these changes will apply to all Households in Salesforce.

An Alternative: Case-by-Case Changes

If you only want to limit the Household Name to the Primary Contact on a case-by-case basis, then utilize the Manage Household button on individual Household records.

The Managed Household feature will provide more granular control by allowing a user to exclude specific contacts from Household Naming fields. In the example below, the child within a household is excluded.

screenhunter_2848-nov-04

To learn more about Household Naming check out this article from the Power of Us Hub: https://powerofus.force.com/kA080000000CsCJ?srPos=0&srKp=ka0&lang=en_US

 

Cloud TnT: Staff Favorite Episodes

cover170x170CLOUD TnT: A PODCAST FOR NONPROFITS USING SALESFORCE.With Tim Lockie, Tracy Kronzak, and Joni Martin.

Want more Cloud TnT?!? Catch up with some staff favorites from this year:

 

 

stevemolis

A Screwdriver and Lightning Boat: Steve Molis

A Very Special Cloud TnT with Salesforce superstar Steve Molis. Cloud TnT covers all kinds of ground, from answering questions and being of genuine service, to equality for all. Tracy fangirls out, and then cries (again). SteveMo chokes up. This is a golden recording, and there are no words for how much fun we had, just listen…

 

  adamkramer

The Next Level: Adam Kramer

While Tim’s away, Cloud TnT is helmed by Joni and Tracy with a fantastic interview with #AwesomeAdmin and consultant extraordinaire, Don Draper. We mean, Adam Kramer. Topics include NPSP evangelism, the NPSP Advisory Board, and building on the NPSP as a technical and community tool, and taking it all to the next level. Does the NPSP have a new mascot? It just might…

 

 

maddYou Really Have to Solve the Problem: Chris Robinson

 

While Tracy is away, Joni and Tim continue Cloud TnT’s #AwesomeAdmin series. Mothers Against Drunk Driving uses Salesforce to help deliver its nationwide services, and Chris talks about his journey implementing, his organization’s work, creating buy-in, and how being a Salesforce administrator fits in to all of it.

 

bonnyhinners

Bringing Us Together: Bonny Hinners

A lively discussion with #AwesomeAdmin, User Group leader, and MVP Bonny Hinners all about how important the customer is to Salesforce, and the changing role of the Salesforce community. A great segue to Dreamforce and the newly-announced Nonprofit Success Pack, covering the Dreamforce keynote previews and the Boston NPSP Sprint. We’re super excited to be heading to Dreamforce this year!